Resizing Images Before Uploading to your Club’s Photo Albums

How does it benefit the club?

Most cameras these days are capable of taking pictures with a resolution of at least 10 mega pixels. That’s usually 3,648 pixels wide and 2,736 pixels tall. The consumer Nikon D800 can take photos at 36.3 megapixels (7,360 pixels wide and 4,912 pixels tall)! That’s great if you want to print large family portraits, but when you consider that most High Definition monitors are only capable of displaying a maximum of 1920 x 768 (i.e. 1 megapixel), unless you have a very specific reason to do so, there’s absolutely no point in uploading such large images to the internet. This is especially true when you consider that most of the time, the pictures won’t be able to take up the full viewing space but will instead be displayed within a webpage. By making your photographs smaller before uploading them to the internet, you vastly improve the download times and therefore the viewing experience for other club members.

Resizing lots of photos every time you want to upload something could be a laborious task, but there are free tools available that make the process extremely easy. We highly recommend using Fotosizer. You can download the free version here, or for £11.99 you can purchase the Pro-version. The only major difference between the free and pro version is that the pro version enables you to add ©copyright watermarks to your images.

In this article I’m going to show you how to quickly resize a batch of images. I’ll include lots of examples which will make it easy to refer to when you want to upload photos to your club's gallery in the future.

Instructions

1. First of all, Download and install Fotosizer.

2. Once that’s done, run the program.

3. In the welcome screen, you can click on Continue, to continue with the free version, or you can click on Buy, to purchase the pro version.

Click on Continue, to continue with the free version, or you can click on Buy, to purchase the pro version

Click on Continue, to continue with the free version, or you can click on Buy, to purchase the pro version

There are a number of ways to select which images you want to be resized, personally, I feel the “add folder” method is the most organised.

4. Go ahead and click on “Add Folder”.

Click on “Add Folder”

Click on “Add Folder”

5. Find the folder containing the images you want to upload.

At this point, you could be forgiven for thinking that clicking on the “Select folder” button would select that folder. In actual fact, you need to open that folder first.

Open the folder which contains the images

Open the folder which contains the images

6. Go ahead and open the folder which contains the images you want to resize.

You will be presented with an empty folder. Don’t worry this normal. Remember, we’re looking for a folder, not the individual images.

Once you’ve opened the folder containing your images, click on Select Folder

Once you’ve opened the folder containing your images, click on Select Folder

7. Once you’ve opened the folder containing your images, click on Select Folder.

In my example, if I hadn’t performed this last step, it would have resized my entire 14-year photographic archive. To ensure that this doesn’t happen, you can check that Fotosizer has loaded the correct images:

Check that Fotosizer has loaded the correct images

Check that Fotosizer has loaded the correct images

8. Once you’re happy that you’re working with the correct images, click on Resize Settings.

Click on Resize Settings

Click on Resize Settings

If you’re uploading the images to your personal club photo gallery, you should copy these settings:

9. Make sure you resize by one side, select the Height option, type in 690, and select px.

This will resize all of your images so that they are at most, 690 pixels tall. This is the largest that your images will appear in the club galleries and so by resizing to 690 pixels tall, we’re making maximum use of the space available.

10. You should also select the Do not enlarge if smaller option.

There’s no point scaling upwards; you might get a larger image, but the quality will be reduced.

Select One side, Height, 690, px

Select One side, Height, 690, px

11. Next, click on Miscellaneous settings and uncheck the Copy EXIF Information checkbox.

EXIF records information such as the shutter speed and aperture size used when the photograph was originally captured. By removing this information we help to reduce the file size.

Uncheck Copy EXIF

Uncheck Copy EXIF

12. In the destination settings, make sure that Save to folder is selected, and then click on the yellow folder icon to select a folder where your resized images will be saved.

I like to create a new folder for the resized images to make sure that I don’t overwrite the originals.

Click on the yellow folder icon

Click on the yellow folder icon

13. Create a folder somewhere that you will be able to easily access later on. Open the folder, and then click on Select folder.

Create a folder that is easily accessible.

Create a folder that is easily accessible.

14. Next, change the output format to JPEG.

JPEG offers the best balance between quality and file size.

Change the output format to JPEG

Change the output format to JPEG

15. Change the filename to custom so that you can give your images meaningful names.

16. In the filename mask, type in a new name for the images.

You should avoid using spaces in your image names but instead use a hyphen. So-that-you-have-an-image-name-like-this. If you didn't do this, every time your image appeared on the internet, the file name would look like this: this%20is%20an%20ugly%20file%20name. Far better to use hyphens. I also like to add %NN onto the end of the file name. %NN will tell Fotosizer to add sequential numbering to the end of my filenames. Each N represents a single digit, so if you have more than 99 images, you should use %NNN.

Rename your files such as my-file-name-%NNN

Rename your files such as my-file-name-%NNN

17. Finally, click on Force lower-case extensions.

Windows isn’t case sensitive when it comes to file names, whereas Linux is case sensitive. On a Linux computer (which most servers on the internet are), my-image.jpg and My-Image.jpg will be treated as entirely seperate files. Similarly, my-image.jpg will be a different file to my-image.JPG. By forcing lower case extensions, you’ll be helping to prevent "Image Not Found" errors.

18. If everything looks OK, click on the tantalizingly lime-green Start button.

Click on Start

Click on Start

19. Once Fotosizer has finished resizing the images, you’ll get an Open Destination Folder button. Click on this to be taken to your newly resized images.

View your resized images

View your resized images

20. You should see that all of your photographs have been renamed and numbered in sequential order, and that all images are no more than 690 pixels tall.

Check the images before uploading to the club website

Check the images before uploading to the club website

21. You can now proceed to upload your images, safely in the knowledge that they have been optimized for the viewing pleasure of other club members.

Posted in Managing Galleries